Should I serve ads against my video?

I’m not sure about you, but I’m more than willing to watch a commercial if I get to watch golf, football, baseball and the news online for free. YouTube, Hulu, Joost, Vimeo – all these sites deliver tons of ad-supported video to consumers for free. Please don’t ask me to pay to see a football game – even though I LOVE football, I’m just not interested in paying to see it on my computer.

Consumers won't pay for content

Consumers won't pay for content

If your business model involves running ads against your video, here are a few things to consider.
Ads are best run in a dynamic environment, using some sort of campaign management system. This allows the content owner to run multiple ads in a variety of way: some ads may run against specific programs; some might be run-of-network; and others might be only run on the weekends. You can also control the number of impressions delivered over a period time. This allows you to sell 1,000 impressions and spread out the delivery over a month.

If your business model involves running ads against your video, here are a few things to consider.

Ads are best run in a dynamic environment, using some sort of campaign management system. This allows the content owner to run multiple ads in a variety of ways:  some ads may run against specific programs; some might be run-of-network; and others might be only run on the weekends. You can also control the number of impressions delivered over a period time. This allows you to sell 1,000 impressions and spread out the delivery over a month.

I have seen some success with sponsored video, which doesn’t necessarily need a campaign management system. For instance, check out http://www.nhra.com to see Full Throttle TV. Full Throttle sponsors the content being produced and is promoted throughout the video.

Normally when you’re running an ad against your video there are two components – the video advertisement and a companion ad (jpg, gif, swf, etc) that can be clicked. Ads are typically tracked by the number of impressions (for a video or companion ad) and number of clicks (companion ad only).

There are dozens of campaign management systems available that are video enabled, including Dart/Doubleclick and AdapTv. These tend to be rather expensive, though they do allow for “third party verification” which can be a requirement of the advertiser. Charges typically include setup fees, monthly fees and a cost per 1,000 deliveries.
Some video platforms include advertising solutions. These tend to have limited campaign control and do not satisfy the third-party verification that can sometimes be required.
Posted by Chuck Ebbets   @   18 September 2009

Like this post? Share it!

RSS Digg Twitter StumbleUpon Delicious Technorati Facebook

0 Comments

No comments yet. Be the first to leave a comment !
Leave a Comment

Name

Email

Website

Previous Post
«
Next Post
»
Powered by Wordpress   |   Lunated designed by ZenVerse